The Time-to-Action Dilemma



dreamstime_m_26639042If you can’t answer these 3 questions in less than 10 minute
s
(and I suspect that you can’t), then your supply chain is not the lever it could be to
 drive more revenue with better margin and less working capital:
1) What are inventory turns by product category (e.g. finished goods, WIP, raw materials, ABC category, etc.)?  How are they trending?  Why?
2) What is the inventory coverageWhat will projected inventory be at by the start of a promotion or season.  Within sourcing, manufacturing or distribution constraints, what options do I have if my demand spikes or tanks?
3) What proportion (and how many) of your customer orders (or margin or revenue) shipped at 99% on-time and in-full?  How many at 98%? And so on . . . Do you understand the drivers?

The slack time that global competition is allowing you to have between planning and execution is collapsing at an accelerating rate.

You need to know the “What?” and the “Why? so you can determine what to do before it’s too late.  

You need to answer the questions that your ERP and APS can’t so your supply chain makes your business more valuable.

Since supply chain decisions are all about managing interrelated goals and trade-offs, data may need to come from various ERP systems, OMS, APS, WMS, MES, and more, so unless you have a platform that consolidates and blends data from end-to-end at every level of granularity and along all dimensions, you will always be reinventing the wheel when it comes to finding and collecting the data for decision support.  It will always take too long.  It will always be too late.

You need the kind of platform that will deliver diagnostic insights so that you can know not just what, but why.  And, once you know what is happening and why, you need to know what to do — your next best action, or at least viable options and their risks . . . and you need that information in context and “in the moment”.

In short, you need to detect opportunities and challenges in your execution and decision-making, diagnose the causes, and direct the next best action in a way that brings execution and decision-making together.

If you don’t have all three now – Detect, Diagnose and Direct – in a way that covers your end-to-end value network, you need to explore how you can get there.

As we approach the weekend, I’ll leave you with this thought to ponder:  Leadership comes from a commitment to something greater than yourself that compels maximum contribution, whether that is leading, following, or just getting out of the way.”

Resilience Versus Agility

Just a short thought as we move into this weekend . . .

Simple definitions of resiliency and agility as they relate to your value network might be as follows:

Resiliency:  The quality of your decisions and plans when their value is not significantly degraded by variability in demand and/or changes in your competitive and economic environment.

Agility:  The ability to adjust your plans and execution for maximum value by responding to the marketplace based on variability in demand and/or changes in your competitive and economic environment.

You can take an analytical approach that will make your plans and decisions resilient and also give you insights into what you need to do in order to be agile.

You need to know the appropriate analytical techniques and how to use them for these ends.

A capable and usable analytical platform can mean the difference between knowing what you should do and actually getting it done.

For example, scenario-based analysis is invaluable for understanding agility, while range-based optimization is crucial for resiliency.

Do you know how to apply these techniques?

Do you have the tools to do it continuously?

Can you create user and manager ready applications to support resiliency and agility?

Finally, I leave you with this thought from Curtis Jones:  “Life is our capital and we spend it every day.  The question is, what are we getting in return?”

Thanks for stopping by.  Have a wonderful weekend!

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