The Time-to-Action Dilemma



dreamstime_m_26639042If you can’t answer these 3 questions in less than 10 minute
s
(and I suspect that you can’t), then your supply chain is not the lever it could be to
 drive more revenue with better margin and less working capital:
1) What are inventory turns by product category (e.g. finished goods, WIP, raw materials, ABC category, etc.)?  How are they trending?  Why?
2) What is the inventory coverageWhat will projected inventory be at by the start of a promotion or season.  Within sourcing, manufacturing or distribution constraints, what options do I have if my demand spikes or tanks?
3) What proportion (and how many) of your customer orders (or margin or revenue) shipped at 99% on-time and in-full?  How many at 98%? And so on . . . Do you understand the drivers?

The slack time that global competition is allowing you to have between planning and execution is collapsing at an accelerating rate.

You need to know the “What?” and the “Why? so you can determine what to do before it’s too late.  

You need to answer the questions that your ERP and APS can’t so your supply chain makes your business more valuable.

Since supply chain decisions are all about managing interrelated goals and trade-offs, data may need to come from various ERP systems, OMS, APS, WMS, MES, and more, so unless you have a platform that consolidates and blends data from end-to-end at every level of granularity and along all dimensions, you will always be reinventing the wheel when it comes to finding and collecting the data for decision support.  It will always take too long.  It will always be too late.

You need the kind of platform that will deliver diagnostic insights so that you can know not just what, but why.  And, once you know what is happening and why, you need to know what to do — your next best action, or at least viable options and their risks . . . and you need that information in context and “in the moment”.

In short, you need to detect opportunities and challenges in your execution and decision-making, diagnose the causes, and direct the next best action in a way that brings execution and decision-making together.

If you don’t have all three now – Detect, Diagnose and Direct – in a way that covers your end-to-end value network, you need to explore how you can get there.

As we approach the weekend, I’ll leave you with this thought to ponder:  Leadership comes from a commitment to something greater than yourself that compels maximum contribution, whether that is leading, following, or just getting out of the way.”

The Value Network, Optimization & Intelligent Visibility

The supply chain is more properly designated a value network through which many supply chains can be tracedMaterial, money and data pulse among links in the value network, following the path of least resistance.

If each node in the value network makes decisions in isolation, the potential grows for the total value in one or more supply chain paths to be less than it could be.  

In the best of all possible worlds, each node would eliminate activities that do not add value to its own transformation process such that it can reap the highest possible margin, subject to maximizing and maintaining the total value proposition for a value network or at least a supply chain within a value network.  This is the best way to ensure long-term profitability, assuming a minimum level of parity in bargaining position among trading partners and in advantage among competitors.

Delivering insights to managers that allow them to react in relevant-time without compromising the value of the network (or a relevant portion of a network, since value networks interconnect to form an extended value web) remains a challenge.

The good news is that many analytical techniques and the mechanisms for delivering them in timely, distributed ways are becoming ubiquitous.  For example, optimization techniques and scenarios can provide insights into profitable ranges for decisions, marginal benefits of incremental resources, and robustness of plans, given uncertain inputs.

When these techniques are combined with intelligent visibility that allows you detect and diagnose anomalies in your supply chain, then everyone can make coordinated decisions as they execute.  

I will leave you with these words of irony from Dale Carnegie, “You make more friends by becoming interested in other people than by trying to interest other people in yourself.”

Thanks again for stopping by and have a wonderful weekend!

Supply Chain Action Blog

The supply chain is more properly designated a value network through which many supply chains can be traced. Material, money and data pulse among links in the value network, following the path of least resistance.

If each node in the value network makes decisions in isolation, the potential grows for the total value in one or more supply chain paths to be less than it could be

In the best of all possible worlds, each node would eliminate activities that do not add value to its own transformation process such that it can reap the highest possible margin, subject to maximizing and maintaining the total value proposition for a value network or at least a supply chain within a value network.  This is the best way to ensure long-term profitability, assuming a minimum level of parity in bargaining position among trading partners and in advantage among…

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On Memorial Day Weekend

Let us remember and honor all who serve a higher good than their own comfort and fulfillment. This is Memorial Day weekend for us in the U.S., but may our memory serve us well when the calendar does not. Let us never forget when uncommon valor becomes a common virtue and those who shirk not their duty, nor shrink from their sacrifice leave their families bereaved. May God bless all who have bravely and knowingly walked into the “valley of the shadow of death” but have never returned, freeing others to pass by unharmed. May they rest forever in our hallowed memories of the price of peace with liberty.  May God bless the families who will always suffer without them. And, may God bless those who have returned but not without cost and their families who suffer with them.

“Moneyball” and Your Business

MV5BMjAxOTU3Mzc1M15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMzk1ODUzNg@@__V1__SY317_CR0,0,214,317_It’s baseball season again!  A while back, the film “Moneyball” showed us how the Oakland A’s built a super-competitive sports franchise on analytics, essentially “competing on analytics”, within relevant business parameters of a major league baseball franchise.  The “Moneyball” saga and other examples of premier organizations competing on analytics were featured in the January 2006 Harvard Business Review article, “Competing on Analytics” (reprint R0601H) by Thomas Davenport, who also authored the book by the same name.

The noted German doctor, pathologist, biologist, and politician, Rudolph Ludwig Karl Virchow called the task of science “to stake out the limits of the knowable.”  We might paraphrase Rudolph Virchow and say that the task of analytics is to enable you to stake out everything that you can possibly know from your data.

That’s what competing on analytics really means.

In your business, you strive to make the highest quality decisions today about how to run your business tomorrow with the uncertainty that tomorrow brings.  That means you have to know everything you possibly can know today.  In an effort to do this, many companies have invested, or are considering an investment, in supply chain intelligence or analytics software.  Yet, many companies who have made huge investments know only a fraction of what they should know from their ERP and other systems while they are mired in long, costly projects that are rapidly losing momentum and delivering little or no value.

Take operational excellence as an example.

Are you able to see a bottleneck build in your order-to-cash process at exactly the step or steps where it is occurring, immediately comprehending the impact because you are seeing hard data in an intelligent context?

What about visibility of supply chain performance?

Can you see that what proportion of your perfect order performance is being caused by days of supply which has been recently impacted by changes in customer order request dates or forecast error?

If operational excellence or supply chain visibility and performance sit high on your list of priorities, your wish list should include the following:

  • Pre-built connectors to your ERP system from a secure, scalable, speedy cloud platform for immediate plug-in and start-up
  • Fast harmonization across multiple ERP instances or data models
  • Comprehensive, domain-specific (supply chain and maybe industry) interrelated metrics that focus new light on the levers for revenue, margin and working capital
  • Simple, but powerful, self-service configuration beyond out-of-the-box metrics
  • Root cause analysis
  • Role-based views with collaboration
  • (Almost) zero learning curve
  • A continuous stream of new value-added services (e.g. what-if scenario analysis, predictive and prescriptive analytics, etc.) based the fact that your provider is now the secure custodian of your enterprise data

Are you competing on analytics?

Are you making use of all of the data available to support better decisions in less time?

Can you instantly see what’s inhibiting your revenue, margin and working capital goals across the entire business in a context?

Do you leverage analytics in the “cloud”?

As always, thanks for stopping by and having a quick read.  I hope you found this both helpful and thought-provoking.

As we enter this weekend, I leave you with one more thought that relates to “business intelligence” — this time, from Socrates:  “The wisest man is he who knows his own ignorance.

Do you know yours?  Do I know mine?

Have a wonderful weekend!

Whither Supply Chain Analytics?

IBM has just released a study “Digital operations transform the physical” (capitalization theirs).

Citing client examples the report states,

“Perpetual planning enables more accurate demand and supply knowledge, as well as more accurate production and assembly status that can lower processing and inventory costs . . .

Analytics + real-time signals = perpetual planning to optimize supply chain flows

They are describing the space to which manufacturers, retailers, distributors, and even service providers are rapidly moving with value network analytics.  This is a challenging opportunity for software providers, and the race is on to enable this in a scalable way.  The leading software providers must rapidly achieve the following:

1)      Critical mass by industry

2)      Custody of all the necessary data and flows necessary for informing decision-makers of dynamic, timely updates of relevant information in an immediately comprehensible context

3)      Fast, relevant, predictive and prescriptive insights that leverage up-to-the-minute information

Some solution provider (or perhaps a few, segmented by industry) is going to own the “extended ERP” (ERP+ or EERP to coin a phrase?) data.  Whoever does that will be able to provide constantly flowing intelligent metrics and decision-support (what IBM has called “perpetual planning”) that all companies of size desperately need.  This means having the ability to improve the management of, working capital, optimize value network flows, minimize value network risk, plan for strategic capacity and contingency, and, perhaps most importantly, decision-making that is “in the moment” that spans the entire value networkThat is the real prize here and a growing number of solution providers are starting to turn their vision toward that goal.  Many are starting to converge on this space from different directions – some from inside the enterprise and some from the extra-enterprise space.

The remaining limiting factor for software vendors and their customers aspiring to accomplish this end-to-end, up-to-the-moment insight and analysis remains the completeness and cleanliness of data.  In many cases, half of this information is just wrong, incomplete, spread across disparate systems, or all of the above.  That is both a threat and an opportunity.  It is a threat because speedily providing metrics, even in the most meaningful visual context is worse than useless if the data used to calculate the metrics are wrong.  An opportunity exists because organizations can now focus on completing, correcting and harmonizing the data that is most essential to the metrics and analysis that matter the most.

What are you doing to achieve this capability for competitive advantage? 

Thanks for stopping by.  I’ll leave you with this thought of my own:

“Ethical corporate behavior comes from hiring ethical people.  Short of that, no amount of rules or focus on the avoidance of penalties will succeed.”

Have a wonderful weekend!

Unconventional Wisdom?

Over years of working with clients, I have found that the most effective way to evaluate an a strategic software project and assess its value has been through a small scale collaborative effort in which both client and vendor invest and participate.  Such an approach serves the best interest of both parties, not just the vendor.

This is true when a client-specific, use-case-specific solution is required for making very complex, very valuable decisions.  This collaborative approach provides several important benefits for the client:

A) Alignment – The vendor quickly gains deep insight into the client’s specific requirements.  In this way the vendor can be sure to capture all key requirements and fully test and demonstrate the value of the solution.  In many cases, the prototype can form the basis of the first phase of the implementation, so the project is ready to start, should the client decide to proceed.

C) Risk Reduction – Because of the learning that takes place prior to any major commitment on the part of the client, the risk associated with a decision to proceed with the overall project is greatly reduced.  The client’s decision regarding whether or not to proceed with the project is more informed than it could be in any other way.  For example, the estimate of the likely return on investment is much more precise.

D) Client Learning – The client learns the vendor’s software and its capabilities better than they could in any classroom setting and  in a very short period of time.

E) Time to Value – The alignment, risk reduction, and client learning drive a faster time-to-value for the overall project.

A joint investment in a small-scale collaborative effort is also a prudent approach.

As a case in point, consider an investment of $10K to evaluate a project costing say $200,000, with a potential ROI of $1 million or more per year.  One might say that it not only makes good business sense to invest the $10K, but that the value achieved in terms of alignment, risk reduction, learning, and time to value make it a bargain.

This seems like a wise approach to me, but unfortunately, it is far too infrequent.

Thanks for stopping by.  I’ll leave you with these few words to ponder from Sir Ronald Gould, “When all think alike, none thinks very much.”

Have a wonderful weekend!

What are “Analytics”?

“Analytics” is one of those business buzz words formed by transforming an adjective into a noun. 

So forceful and habitual is such misuse of language that one might call it a compulsion among business analysts and writers.

The term “analytics” commonly refers to software tools that can be used to organize, report, and sometimes visualize data in attempt to lend meaning for decision-makers.  These capabilities have been advanced in recent years so that many types of graphical displays can be readily employed to expose data and try to make information from it.   “Analytics” has been used to refer to a very broad array of software applications.  Numerous industry analysts have attempted to segment these applications in various ways.  “Analytics” refers to so many kinds of applications that it is useful to establish some broad categories.

A simple, though imperfect, scheme such as the following may be the most useful where the potential value that can be achieved through each category increases from #1 through #4.

Reports – repetitively run displays of pre-aggregated and sorted information with limited or no user interactivity.

Dashboards – frequently updated displays of performance metrics which can be displayed graphically.  They are ideally tailored to the needs of a given role.  Dashboards support the measurement of performance, based on pre-aggregated data with some user selection and drill-down capability.  Hierarchies of metrics have been created that attempt to facilitate a correlation between responsibility and performance indicators.  The most common such model is the Supply Chain Operations Reference Model (SCOR Model) that was created and is maintained by the Supply Chain Council.

Data Analysis Tools – interactive software applications that enable data analysts to dynamically aggregate, sort, plot, and otherwise explore data, based on metadata.  Significant advancements have been made in recent years to dramatically expand the options for visualizing data and accelerating the speed at which these tools can generate results.

Decision Support/Management Science Tools – simulation, optimization, and other approaches to multi-criteria decisions which require the application of statistics and mathematical modeling and solving.

Let’s focus on Decision Support/Management Science Tools, the category with the most potential for adding value to strategic (high value) decision-making in a sustained fashion. 

So, then, if that is what analytics are, do they enable higher quality decisions in less time, and if so, to what extent are those better decisions in less time driving cash flow and value for their business?  These are critically important questions because improved, integrated decision-making that is based in facts and adjusted for risk drives the bottom line.

Execution is good, but operational execution under a poor decision set is like going fast in the wrong direction.  It is bad, but perhaps not immediately fatal.  Poor decisions will put a business under very quickly.

Enabling higher quality decisions in less time depends on the decision-maker, but it can also depend on the tools employed and the skills of the analysts using the tools. 

The main activities in using these tools involve the following:

  1. Sifting through the oceans of data that exist in today’s corporate information systems
  2. Synthesizing the relevant data into information (a thoughtful data model within an analytical application is helpful, but not sufficient)
  3. Presenting it in such a way so that a responsible manager can combine it with experience and quickly know how to make a better decision

Obtaining a valuable result requires careful preparation and skilled interaction, asking the right questions initially and throughout the above activities.

Some of the questions that need to be asked before the data can be synthesized into information in a useful way are represented by those given below:

  1. What is the business goal?
  2. What decisions are required to reach the goal?
  3. What are the upper and lower bounds of each decision? (Which outcomes are unlivable?)
  4. How sensitive is one decision to the outcome of other, interdependent decisions?
  5. What risks are associated with a given decision outcome?
  6. Will a given decision today impact the options for the same decision tomorrow?
  7. What assumptions are implicitly driven by insufficient data?
  8. How reliable is the data upon which the decision is based?
    • Is it accurate?
    • How much of the data has been driven by one-time events that are not repeatable?
    • What data is missing?
    • Is the data at the right level of detail?
    • How might the real environment in which the decision is to be implemented be different from that implied by the data and model (i.e. an abstraction of reality)?
    • How can the differences between reality and its abstraction be reconciled so that the results of the model are useful?

Ask the right questions.

Know the relative importance of each.

Understand which techniques to apply in order to prioritize, analyze and synthesize the data into useful information that enables faster, better decisions.

We often think of change when a new calendar year rolls around.  Since this is my first post of the new year, I”ll leave you with one of my favorite quotes on change.  Leo Tolstoy:  “Everybody thinks of changing humanity, and nobody thinks of changing himself.”

Have a wonderful weekend!

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