Make Analytics Useful, Meaningful and Actionable

Last week, I identified reasons for the organizational malady of failing to fully leverage analytics to make higher quality decisions in less time.  As promised, this week, I want to share a remedy.

For the analyst, I recommend the following:

  1. Put yourself in the shoes of the decision-maker.  Try to step back from the details of your analysis for a moment and ask yourself the questions he or she will ask.
  2. Engage your decision-maker in the process.  Gather their perspective as an input.  Don’t make any assumptions.  Ask lots of questions.  They probably know things that you don’t know about the question you are trying to answer.  Draw them out.  Schedule updates with the decision-maker, but keep them brief and focused on essentials.  Ask for their insight and guidance.  It may prove more valuable than you think.
  3. Take time to know, explore and communicate the “Why?” of your analysis – Why is the analysis important?  Why are the results the way they are?  To what factors are the results most sensitive and why?  Why are the results not 100% conclusive?  What are the risks and why do they exist?  What are the options? 
  4. Make sure you schedule time to explain your approach and the “Why?”  Your decision-maker needs to know beforehand that this is what you are planning to do.  You will need to put the “Why”? in the context of the goals and concerns of your decision-maker.
  5. Consider the possible incentives for your decision-maker to ignore your recommendations and give him or her reasons to act on your recommendations that are also consistent with their own interest.
  6. “A picture is worth a thousand words.”  Make the analysis visual, even interactive, if possible.
  7. Consider delivering the results in Excel (leveraging Visual Basic, for example), not just in a Power Point presentation or a Word document.  In the hands of a skilled programmer and analyst, amazing analysis and pictures can be developed and displayed through Visual Basic and Excel.  Every executive already has a license for Excel and this puts him or her face-to-face with the data (hopefully in graphical form as well as tabular).  You may be required to create a Power Point presentation, but keep it minimal and try to complement it with Excel or another tool that actually contains the data and the results of your analysis. 

Frustration with your decision-making audience will not help them, you, or the organization.  Addressing them where they are by intelligently and carefully managing the “soft” side of analytics will often determine whether you make a difference or contribute to a pile of wasted analytical effort. 

Thanks again for stopping by.  I hope that these suggestions will improve the usefulness of your analysis.  As a final thought for the weekend, consider these words from Booker T. Washington, “There is no power on earth that can neutralize the influence of a high, pure, useful and simple life.” 

Have a wonderful weekend!

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About Arnold Mark Wells
Industry, software, and consulting background. I help companies do the things about which I write. If you think it might make sense to explore one of these topics for your organization, I would be delighted to hear from you. I am employed by Opalytics.

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