Uncovering Unprofitable Decisions

Last week, I expanded on the concept of a profitability profile, the first point of three that I highlighted here.   This week, as promised, I want to expend a few words on analyzing decision processes that are hurting profitability because they could be improved. 

Execution is important in business, but knowing what to execute is even more fundamental and critical, at all levels from strategic to tactical.

You can make better business decisions (some of them are called planning – demand planning, supply planning, capacity planning, transportation planning) in less time if you embed the decision points in a process and support the process with necessary analytics (see “Finding the Value in Your Value Network“).

Decision processes need to be integrated because many of them are interdependent.  If made in isolation, reduced profit is almost guaranteed.  This has driven a continuing interest in Sales and Operations Planning, the goal of which is to include the relevant data, perspectives and analytics so that key decisions about running the business are coordinated and optimal for the business as a whole.  Sometimes, this process is called Integrated Business Planning or Integrated Business Management, or perhaps other titles.  The important thing is not the moniker, but the fundamentals of getting the process right for your business. 

Business decisions that frequently lead to reduced profit can include pricing, new product development, supply chain network design, demand planning, capacity planning, inventory planning, production scheduling, and others.  One big reason these decision processes can fail is that they are not sufficiently linked, leaving blind spots that keep relevant tradeoffs from being considered.

Finally, just because you have spent lots of money licensing, implementing and supporting software applications that were supposed to address specific decisions or even decision processes, doesn’t mean you are any better off.  (You already know this!)  There are lots of reasons, including the following:

  1. The software didn’t fit the business challenge
  2. The data model doesn’t effectively abstract reality
  3. Your master data is inadequately maintained
  4. The planner or analyst doesn’t have sufficient experience or skill to deal with data model deficiencies and master data defects
  5. The software application doesn’t allow the skilled planner or analyst to interact with it so that they can compensate for data model deficiencies and master data defects
  6. The parameters of the software application aren’t correctly set
  7. The software application leaves out important tradeoffs
  8. And the list can go on . . .

Remember that rapid execution is only as good as the plan to which you are executing, and that’s the thought for this weekend.

Thanks again for stopping by and have a wonderful weekend!

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About Arnold Mark Wells
Industry, software, and consulting background. I help companies do the things about which I write. If you think it might make sense to explore one of these topics for your organization, I would be delighted to hear from you. I am employed by Opalytics.

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